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Sweet Briar College professors unanimously oppose school closing

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Are student-athletes being cheated out of an education?

As March Madness ignites Americans' yearly obsession with college basketball games and broken brackets, a new book is calling attention to a different kind of madness: the systemic academic fraud at the center of college sports.
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Sweet Briar College professors unanimously oppose school closing

Sweet Briar College professors unanimously oppose school closing

When Sweet Briar College, a women's liberal arts school in rural Virginia, announced earlier this month that it was closing, many observers were surprised, as the college is still sitting on a sizable $85 million endowment.
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Special-needs policies can be a tug-of-war for parents, teachers and administrators

Special-needs policies can be a tug-of-war for parents, teachers and administrators

Benay Josselson’s 7 1/2-year-old son, whom she describes as “high-functioning on the autistic spectrum,” is allowed to take breaks during class and, in certain classes, to use so-called fidget toys to help him focus. But in other classes at the Rockland County, New York, Jewish day school, teachers who find the "fidgets" distracting don't permit them.
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Robot allows online teachers more personal connection with students

Robot allows online teachers more personal connection with students

The Nexus Academy of Columbus is using robots to connect remote teachers from around the country with students at the school in Columbus, Ohio, according to Education News.
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Rash of suicides leads MIT to rethink student pressure

Rash of suicides leads MIT to rethink student pressure

After a rash of suicides the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, including four in the past year and two in the last month, the school has announced plans to lighten workloads and offer better social support.
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Rash of suicides for MIT to rethink student pressure

Rash of suicides for MIT to rethink student pressure

After a rash of suicides the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, including four in the past year and two in the last month, the school has announced plans to lighten workloads and offer better social support.
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Reading is much more decoding than letter and words

Reading is much more decoding than letter and words

Daniel Willingham is a cognitive psychologist at the University of Virginia with a background in neuroscience who now focuses on education. He wrote a widely acclaimed 2010 book titled, “Why Don't Students Like School?” His new book, “Raising Kids Who Read,” off the presses this month, is an accessible hands-on guide for parents who want to help kids become avid readers at home and school. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.
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NYC mayor says no to plan to seize failing schools

NYC mayor says no to plan to seize failing schools

The Democrat's internecine battle over education reform is ratcheting up in New York, as New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo continue to spar over how to reform the city's failing schools.
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No-pay MBA completes test run

No-pay MBA completes test run

Why go into heavy debt and disrupt your life for a certification of business training that you can get essentially for free? That's the question Laurie Pickard asked when she launched her No-Pay MBA project in August of 2013, setting out to earn an MBA using Massive Online Courses, or MOOCs.
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First Islamic college in United States granted accreditation

First Islamic college in United States granted accreditation

Zaytuna, a small liberal arts college in Berkeley, California, has been granted accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The accreditation makes Zaytuna the first accredited Muslim college in the United States, reports Education News.
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Helen Keller on optimism, education and never giving up

Helen Keller on optimism, education and never giving up

In 1987, Congress passed a resolution designating the month of March as "Women's History Month," a tradition that each president since Ronald Reagan has honored.
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Kormath qualifies for state geographic bee

Kormath qualifies for state geographic bee

Pooja Kormath, a fifth-grader at Carver Elementary School, has qualified to compete in the state level competition of the National Geographic Bee, sponsored by Plum Creek.  

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Updated: mar. 12, 2015 6:00 p.m.
RHE student visits with 2-star general

RHE student visits with 2-star general

Holdyn Udinsky, a second-grader at Richmond Hill Elementary, recently visited the “War Room” of two-star Gen. Buford Blount, former head of the 3rd Infantry Division.

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Updated: mar. 12, 2015 4:30 p.m.
RHPS book fair under way

RHPS book fair under way

Richmond Hill Primary School is holding its book fair during school hours through Friday. Profits from the sale will be used to buy student iPads. Pictured from left are first-graders Kyleigh Reed, Jack Pittman, Brenner Kawakami and Alexis Reed.

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Updated: mar. 12, 2015 3:00 p.m.
Harvard-bound Jaden Freeze is county's STAR

Harvard-bound Jaden Freeze is county's STAR

Jaden Freeze, who says learning comes naturally to him, was named Richmond Hill High School STAR student Monday.

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Updated: mar. 12, 2015 2:06 p.m.
Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act changes what schoolkids choose to eat at cafeterias

Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act changes what schoolkids choose to eat at cafeterias

Students are choosing fruits in the cafeteria line more now than in 2012, when nutrition changes for school lunches were implemented, according to a study from Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at the University of Connecticut, The New York Times reported.
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Democratic congressmen hail from more elite colleges than their GOP counterparts

Democratic congressmen hail from more elite colleges than their GOP counterparts

Democrats in the House of Representatives are far more likely to have been trained at elite, private schools than their GOP counterparts. Following up on a graphic from the U.S. Senate last month, a new graphic put together by College Raptor shows marked differences in educational backgrounds.
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